Articles Posted in Real Estate

A few weeks ago, we hired a contractor to do some painting at our house.  As many contractors do, he put a sign in our yard while he was there. He didn’t ask us for permission, but if he had we would have given it to him.  A few days later, in fact after the painter and his sign were gone, we received a nastygram from our homeowner’s association informing us that our covenants prohibit any signs in the yard other than a sign advertising the property for sale. I noticed that there is no exception for political signs, and I wondered why we had not received a nastygram a few years ago when we put a candidate’s sign in our yard before an election.

I now know the answer to that, thanks to a recent Face Book post from my friend, Greg Purvis, an attorney at Spangler, Jennings, & Dougherty, P.C.

Greg pointed out that Indiana law, specifically Ind. Code § 32‑21‑13‑4,* prohibits homeowners’ associations from adopting or enforcing rules prohibiting certain types of signs on a homeowner’s property from thirty days before an election until five days after an election. It applies only to signs that meet one or more of the following descriptions:

Fair disclosure:  I am entirely unqualified to answer the above question.  In fact, I had never heard of blockchain technology until this morning when I read a blog entry by my friend, John Cunningham, with a link to an article discussing four technological innovations that may affect the legal profession. One of them is blockchain, part of the technology that makes bitcoins possible.  Not only that, but I don’t know a lot more about bitcoins than I know about blockchain.  I do, however, know a little about real property records.

Now that you’ve been warned, if you’re still interested, read on.

What is Blockchain?